Interview with Waleed Al-Rujaib

Title

Interview with Waleed Al-Rujaib

Description

Waleed Al-Rujaib starts the interview by talking about growing up in Hawali. He recalls living with his extended family and his early memories of tending animals with his grandmother. He describes his relationship with his parents and how they instilled in him the love of reading and writing. He explains how this love grew during his elementary education and speaks of the influence of Palestinian teachers on him during his school years.
Talking about his early teen years, Al-Rujaib describes his love of cinema, books and magazines, and music. During that age he moved from Hawali to Qadsiya and later to Rumaithiya. He then talks about his early adult life and describes studying social work in Egypt, the difficulties he faced there, and the good times he experienced while studying abroad.
Al-Rujaib speaks about coming back to Kuwait in the 1970s and working in the field of education. He talks about getting married, continuing his education in the United States, and having his first child there. After finishing his studies in the US, he describes coming back to Kuwait and working at Kuwait University in the 1980s.
A large portion of the interview is dedicated to talking about the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. Al-Rujaib describes in detail the beginning of the invasion, participating in demonstrations against the Iraqi occupation, civil disobedience, and being part of the resistance. After that he speaks about the liberation and leaving Kuwait to Bahrain to flee the pollution of the oil fires. He ends the interview by talking about his writing career, Kuwait Writers Association, and the National Council for Culture, Arts, and Letters.

Date

14/07/2018

Format

audio

Language

Arabic

Type

oral history

Interviewer

Reem Al-Ali

Interviewee

Waleed Al-Rujaib

Location

Odayliya - Kuwait

Original Format

audio

Duration

7 hours

Files

Waleedphoto.jpg


Citation

“Interview with Waleed Al-Rujaib,” AUK Oral History, accessed August 3, 2020, http://www.aukoralhistory.org/items/show/6.